Lyme disease news and media for tick borne illness

Awareness Events Lyme and Public Policy Physician Training In the News

Traditional and New Media

Register with Indiana Lyme Connect for the 500 Mini-Marathon or 5k walk for 2018

Register with Indiana Lyme Connect for the 500 Mini-Marathon or 5k walk for 2018

 

March 11th Indy Meeting Event

Indiana Lyme Connect panel on Lyme disease for patients and caregivers.

 

PDF Flyer of the Event for Family and Friends, and Those with Lyme

 

Trying to better understand Lyme disease? Want to support your friends/family member with Lyme but don’t know how? Join us and hear from panelists ranging in age from youth to retirement who have Lyme, caregivers, and a Lyme medical expert.

– Bring your questions!
– Dairy free/sugar free/dairy friendly snacks to share are welcome

NOTE: Change of location this month – Whitestown Municipal Hall
6210 Veterans Drive, Whitestown, IN 46075 (1 mile east of I-65/Exit 130 Interchange)

PDF Flyer of the Event for Family and Friends, and Those with Lyme
March’s Location on Google Maps:  https://goo.gl/maps/p6foytSvojw

We look forward to seeing you, your family and friends there for discussions with our Lyme panel! ILC members thank you for setting aside time to better understand how to support those with Lyme through this complicated and lengthy journey.

Thank you,
Indiana Lyme Connect

 

Lyme Awareness: Saturday, June 4, 2016 from 1:30 to 3:30.

Lyme is the epidemic of our time.
Lyme is the epidemic of our time.

Indiana Lyme Connect presents A FREE VIEWING of Under Our Skin: The Untold Story of Lyme Disease

Yes Cinema
328 Jackson St.
Columbus, IN 47201

February 25th, 2017
Doors open at 9
Film starts at 10

 

Thank you to our co-sponsors

chevyofcolumbus.net

yescinema.org

Lincoln Central Neighborhood Family Center – lcnfc.org

 

Supporting Individuals with Lyme Borreliosis Complex

Since our incorporation, ILC has responded to hundreds of inquiries from individuals and provided encouragement, support, and connecting them to resources. Supporting individuals and families with LBC is the foundation of our mission; it is the heart of our ILC.

We currently host two monthly support groups in Bloomington and Indianapolis with about 70 active members participating. Our hope is for individuals with LBC and those who support them leave our meetings understood, hopeful, and better equipped.  From telling of personal stories, to compassionate listening, to sharing of Lyme friendly recipes, to favorite detoxifications strategies; we strive to provide a safe place for all who attend.

Additionally, our FaceBook page (Indiana Lyme Connect) keeps people informed of upcoming events and opportunities for engagement and education.


ILC, Indiana Lyme Connect, met with the Indiana Department of Health, the Department of Natural Resources, and the Indiana Hospital Association for discussions regarding awareness of tick-borne diseases and prevention in Indiana. These meetings came out of the HR55, House Resolution 55, passed this past March. ILC is most grateful for the departments’ time and active engagement. All agreed that by pooling resources, updating data, and furthering education, Hoosiers can be better served and protected from the spread of tick-borne diseases.

 


With much gratitude for Ice Miller's pro bono work of Mark Shublak and Carl Drummer.
Indiana Lyme Connect’s board members LeAnne Barta and Brent Huber with Mark Shublak of Ice Miller holding Indiana General Assembly’s House Resolution 55.

 

With much gratitude for Ice Miller’s pro bono work of Mark Shublak and Carl Drummer.

 

 

May, 2017 was Lyme Disease Awareness Month in Indiana – See Below

Indiana Proclamation that May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month

Indiana Lyme Resolution Signed

Indiana Lyme Resolution Additional Signatures

 

 

 

Resolution link: https://iga.in.gov/legislative/2017/resolutions/house/simple/55

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
April 4, 2017

SHACKLEFORD RECOGNIZES THE IMPORTANCE OF LYME DISEASE AWARENESS, PROTECTION

INDIANAPOLIS- Members of the Indiana House today joined State Representative Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis) in asking that the month of May be devoted to recognizing the importance of Lyme disease awareness and protection.

Shackleford’s resolution encourages an expanded effort to keep Indiana residents properly informed about Lyme disease prevention, symptom recognition, limitations in diagnostic testing, and means of treatment. It calls for the Indiana State Department of Health, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the Indiana State Medical Association, the Indiana Hospital Association, and Indiana Lyme Connect to meet and devise a plan to better educate residents about the disease.

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that can result in severe and lasting effects in Hoosiers, including neuropsychiatric and musculoskeletal diseases. These can cause changes in mood, behavior, perception, memory, cognition, or judgment.

Lyme disease is most commonly transferred through the bite of a deer tick. A person may become infected with this disease after the tick has been attached to their skin for as little as 24 to 36 hours.

Hoosiers may experience Lyme disease even if they do not have a red bull’s eyes rash that is associated with this disease.

Those who are infected may experience lingering symptoms such as debilitating fatigue, pain, and impaired cognitive function that may persist for months and possibly years.

Diagnostic techniques for this disease are not sufficiently accurate, which can result in faulty testing.

“There are around 300,000 cases of Lyme disease reported annually each year in the United States,” Shackleford said. “In Indiana alone, the number of reported Lyme disease cases has tripled in recent years. In 2016, one out of 30 dogs tested in Indiana were infected,” said Shackleford. “That is why it is imperative that we make our fellow Hoosiers aware of how common this disease is and how to spot the warning signs.”

 

Lymedisease.org has posted a call for action asking constituents to reach out to their Senators to encourage them to engage as co-signers to Senate Bill 1503 The Lyme and Tick-Borne Disease Prevention, Education and Research Act.

Email Your Representative

Please visit their website for additional information and a sample letter to share with your representatives.
Thank you!

 

 

Attica-Williamsport Rotary

President Merry Weber thanks Mrs. Barta 
for an excellent and eye opening program about Lyme Desease.
Attica-Williamsport Rotary Program, Lyme Desease by Mrs. LeAnne Barta – July 27, 2016


Support Indiana Lyme Connect by shopping at Lucky’s Market in Bloomington! Bring reusable bags with you the next time you shop. At check out, you’ll be given a wooden dime for each bag that you brought with you. You can then donate that dime to benefit Indiana Lyme Connect. What’s more, Lucky’s Market matches every donation to double the impact. Thank you for supporting our community!”

2017 ILADS Training Stipend – Application for Healthcare Professionals

GENERAL PROVISIONS

Indiana Lyme Connect, Inc. (“ILC”) allocates a limited annual budget to Indiana physicians and healthcare providers seeking to attend the fall Annual Lyme Disease Conference*, in Boston, sponsored by the International Lyme and Associated Disease Society, ILADS. The following provisions apply to all applicants for all such funding:

  1. The attached written application form must be submitted by August 20, 2017.
  2. A formal interview via phone will follow the written application. ILC will inform applicants of grant awards no later than August 31 2017.
  3. First time attendees to ILADS conference, are eligible for the one day Lyme Fundamentals Course in addition to two additional days of the Scientific Conference.
  4. Previous ILADS conference attendees, are eligible for the three day Scientific Conference.
  5. ILC will provide a $1000 stipend for the fall ILADS training/scientific conference which will cover registration. Applicants might consider an ILADS membership which provides a discounted conference registration fee.
  6. Within thirty days after attending the conference, the attendee will submit a brief, formal reporton each of the workshops attended, impact of the ILADS conference on his/her future personal healthcare practice, as well as any recommendations for furthering Lyme education in Indiana. The stipend reward will follow the submission of the report.*ILADS offers both a one day Lyme Fundamentals Course (Nov 9) and a three day Annual Scientific Conference (Nov 10-12) called “Tick -Borne Diseases: The Global Perspective.”
    See the course information on Boston ILADS training.

Again, View the full 4 page application here.

 21 July, 2016

Diagnosing Lyme Disease: Clinical Strategies for Disease Detection; Thursday, July 21, 2016 Elizabeth Maloney, MD

Diagnosing-Lyme-Disease

Product Description

The Medical Academic Center welcomes Elizabeth Maloney, M.D., to Carmel, IN, Thursday, July 21, 2016.  Dr. Maloney is a family physician from Wyoming, MN.  She graduated from the University of MN Medical School and completed her residency in family medicine at the University; she has been a family practice physician for greater than twenty years.  Dr. Maloney has authored accredited, evidence-based CME courses on Lyme disease for primary care physicians.  She is a member of the American Academy of Family Practice, the MN Academy of Family Practice and the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society.

Objectives

Participants will learn the following re: Lyme disease:

  1. Understand the epidemiology of and risk factor assessment
  2. Know the basic pathophysiology of early and late disease stages
  3. Recognize common presentations
  4. How to evaluate patients
  5. Understand the role of serologic testing in the diagnosis

Program approved for 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™

For more information and to register go to MAC Diagnosing Lyme Disease.

Program supported by: Indiana Spine Group and Indiana Lyme Connect

 

 

Video – Diagnosing Lyme Disease: Clinical Strategies for Disease Detection; Elizabeth Maloney, M.D.

Thursday, November 17, 2016 by Elizabeth Maloney, MD

2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ class.  Please pass along this FREE, ACCREDITED class information to other health professionals.

Therapeutic Principles & Evidence-based Treatment Options in Lyme Disease

Thursday, November 17, 2016 by Elizabeth Maloney, MD

Product Description

The Medical Academic Center welcomes back Elizabeth Maloney, M.D., to Carmel, IN, Thursday, November 17, 2016.  Dr. Maloney is a family physician from Wyoming, MN.  She graduated from the University of MN Medical School and completed her residency in family medicine at the University; she has been a family practice physician for greater than twenty years.  Dr. Maloney has authored accredited, evidence-based CME courses on Lyme disease for primary care physicians.  She is a member of the American Academy of Family Practice, the MN Academy of Family Practice and the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society.

Objectives

Participants will learn the following re: Lyme disease:

  • Definition of evidence-based medicine and the role of trial evidence in it
  • Basic principles for evaluating the quality of clinical trials
  • Clinical trial evidence for managing patients with Ixodes scapularis bites, erythema migrans, or late, untreated neurologic Lyme disease
  • Therapeutic options for Ixodes scapularis bites, erythema migrans, or late, untreated neurologic Lyme disease

Program approved for 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™

More information about the November 17th event

 

Indiana Lyme Connect (“ILC”) offered a stipend to attend the ILADS conference to two applicants.  The winners of this year’s stipend to the ILADS conference were Mary Lou Hulseman, MD and a PA.

Indiana Lyme Connect, Inc. (“ILC”) allocates a limited annual budget to Indiana physicians and healthcare providers seeking to attend the fall Annual Lyme Disease Conference* sponsored by the International Lyme and Associated Disease Society, ILADS.
Please see the entire application in the web form in the section below or in PDF** format in the first link below.

  1. **ILADS 2016 Training Application in PDF form
  2. ILADS 2016 Philadelphia – General Information
  3. Lyme Fundamentals Pre-conference Workshop
  4. Lyme Disease Conf: An Evolving Paradigm for Chronic Illness

 

 

 

‘Duck Dynasty’s’ Mary Kate Robertson reveals family’s decade-long struggle with Lyme disease

 

Mary Kate Robertson is opening up about her family’s battle with Lyme disease.

The college student, who is married to Willie and Korie Robertson’s eldest son John Luke, said she decided to share her story to help those who are “battling a chronic illness” to know “you are not alone.”

“[It’s hard] to talk about the things that are still very real and very present…the things you are still struggling with that make your heart ache pretty deeply,” Robertson wrote on her blog The Little Duck Wife.

The Louisiana native wrote her father was diagnosed with Lyme disease after a family trip to DisneyWorld when Robertson was in the fourth grade. She said at the time her family was happy to have an explanation for her dad feeling “so sick.”

Source – Foxnews

Support Group Hopes to Make Indiana a ‘Lyme Literate State’

She [Susan Coleman] was eventually diagnosed with Lyme disease, an infection caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. That was in 2012. In 2014, the lifelong Bloomington resident joined with LeAnne Barta of Indianapolis and started the nonprofit group Indiana Lyme Connect.

The goal of the all-volunteer organization is to make Indiana a “Lyme literate state,” says Coleman, the state organization’s secretary and the Bloomington support group leader. “We discovered a need for educating doctors and people in the community,” she says. That includes offering information on symptoms, early detection, the unreliability of Lyme tests, and the  growing threat of Lyme disease. There are 300,000 new cases diagnosed nationally each year. In 2016, the group sponsored Lyme disease courses for 130 medical professionals

Source – Bloom Magazine

In the News – Lyme Disease and Tick Information

Special Topic, Part I – Rehabilitation after Lyme Borreliosis Complex with Dr. Brad Ralston.

Indiana Lyme Support Group

Infected tissue can’t heal. But after Lyme disease is beaten down, there is hope. Health can return.

Anyone who has experienced chronic Lyme disease and its associated infections can attest to the devastating emotional, cognitive, muscular/skeletal, and organ damage caused by Lyme. After years of treatment, everyone needs hope that the body can heal. ILC is responding to the many requests for testimonies of therapies that have helped individuals address cognitive dysfunction, nerve/soft tissue damage, vision and hearing sensitivity, and emotional trauma.

Saturday: explore various therapies that have helped many former Lyme patients get back their life. This is part one of a three part series with local practitioners addressing visual/cognitive rehabilitation as well as regenerative nerve/soft tissue injury treatments.

September 9th, 2017: Indianapolis Support Group Meeting

Women living with debilitating tick bite illness say it could happen to anyone

“I just miss being there for my children on a daily basis”

Indiana Lyme Connect is in the full news story along with the above video on Indianapolis’ WTHR about preventing tick bites and the devastation of Lyme Disease.  View the full news story.

Ella is in the news story and is a friend and frequent participant in Indiana Lyme Connect’s monthly Lyme meetings, hers is in the Indianapolis area.

“Ella says she misses her job. What she’s gone through, she equates to a series of losses.”

Also in the news story is Dr. Kimberly Lentz, a recognized Lyme Literate Doctor, LLD, in the Indianapolis area.

What you wear when working or playing could reduce your chances of tick bites. Remember: Ticks start LOW and crawl UP; ticks do not jump, fly or drop from trees, they are down on the ground and crawl up until they find a good spot to attach. Tucking pant legs into socks is a good way to keep ticks on the outside where they may be seen or get brushed off.  Source TERC

 

View the article on Wired, 06/17/2017 by Megan Molteni

OH, LOVELY: THE TICK THAT GIVES PEOPLE MEAT ALLERGIES IS SPREADING

FIRST COMES THE unscratchable itching, and the angry blossoming of hives. Then stomach cramping, and—for the unluckiest few—difficulty breathing, passing out, and even death. In the last decade and a half, thousands of previously protein-loving Americans have developed a dangerous allergy to meat. And they all have one thing in common: the lone star tick…

 

View the article on USA Today, 06/02/2017.

12 reasons to take ticks seriously

As the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States, Lyme disease has been getting a lion’s share of the attention lately.

But ticks — the U.S. has almost 100 varieties but only a few bite humans — can be hosts to nearly a dozen other diseases that can be passed on to you and your children when they latch onto your skin.

That’s the reason to wear shoes, socks and long pants before heading out to enjoy nature, whether on a hike in the woods or playing in a grassy field.

Question: How do I keep a tick from biting me?…

Answer: That’s the best way to prevent catching any disease that a tick might carry.

1. Avoid brush-filled, grassy areas on the outskirts of fields and woods.

2. Cover up, especially the ankles, feet and legs that ticks find first on their travels around your body.

3. Use insect repellents that ward off ticks and mosquitoes even if you consider them messy

4. Check yourself and your pets for ticks after you’ve been outdoors. This is perhaps the most important tip. Ticks can take up to 24 hours or more to find a feeding spot and latch on, so you’ve got a little time…

 

 

View the article on Psychology Today, 03/29/2017.

The Coming Pandemic of Lyme Dementia

The Increasing Threat from Lyme Disease.

There are many known causes of dementia. One of these causes are bacteria. Bacteria are usually ignored despite its historical and current significance in dementia research.  A hundred years ago it was well known that syphilis—a bacterium—was the only known cause of dementia. The bacteria interferes with the nerves until it reaches the brain where it destroys the brain from the inside…

…there are more than half the world’s populations that are vulnerable to Lyme disease. A proportion of these populations will become infected with Lyme disease and eventually some will lead to dementia. Pure Lyme dementia exists and reacts well to antibiotics [4].  Is public health ready to address this?

 

Family shares story of Lyme disease, a tick-borne illness

Why Lyme? – Partnership for Tick-borne Diseases Education


 

Notice that Indiana is in the red, yellow and blues for Lyme Disease.

Lyme Disease prediction for 2017 in Indiana

There are more and more Lyme and tick articles in the main stream media.  Here are just a few articles we found.

 

View the New York Post article on Market Watch, Apr 25, 2017:

Lyme disease is threatening an unprecedented 2017

A bumper crop of acorns could be putting the U.S. on the brink of an unprecedented outbreak of Lyme disease, experts warn.

“An estimated 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year, but the illness now may be on track to see 2017 become the worst year ever, according to Rick Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y…”

 

View the article on the Huffington Post, 04/26/2017.

What the Media Don’t Tell You About Lyme Disease (But Should)

“I’ve seen more Lyme disease headlines over the past couple of months than ever before. It’s a good thing and a terrible thing. It means that news organizations and magazines are finally paying attention to this often-devastating disease and making an effort to inform the public about it. It’s a bad thing because, as has been the lede of many of the stories, researchers have predicted that 2017 will be one of the worst on record for new Lyme infections because of a mild winter and a warming climate in general that is making more of the country a haven for ticks.

A Google search of news that mentioned Lyme disease over the past 30 days (March 26 – April 26, 2017) returns 43 pages of results. That’s a lot. By comparison, searches for other common and life-affecting infectious diseases HIV and Zika return 72 and 32, respectively.”

 

View the CNBC article on Lyme Disease diagnostics, 7 Feb 2017.

A technology backed by Bill Gates may revolutionize diagnostics for Lyme disease

“Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks.

While the medical and health community is putting a spotlight on diseases like Zika, Ebola and tuberculosis, another disease, transmitted by ticks, is getting little notice: Lyme disease.

The ticks that carry Lyme disease are spreading rapidly across the U.S. and are now located in nearly half of the country. The CDC estimates that 300,000 Americans are infected with Lyme disease. But the number of sufferers may be much higher, some Lyme disease experts believe. About 2.8 million have been diagnosed and a whopping 1.55 million are suffering lingering effects from the disease, also known as chronic Lyme disease or Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome, according to Dorothy Kupcha Leland, vice president for education and outreach for LymeDisease.org…”

 

 

View the Wall Street Journal Article, April 24, 2017:

Prepare for a Bad Summer for Ticks
Mild winters and big deer and mice populations mean more ticks and higher rates of Lyme disease diagnoses

“Tick and Lyme disease season is here, and scientists warn this year it could be worse than ever. Dr. Goudarz Molaei joins Lunch Break’s Tanya Rivero to explain what triggered the rapid spread of the disease and how we can avoid being affected…”

Pay wall on the WSJ website on occasion.

 

What does it feel like to have chronic Lyme disease?

 

** Read through the Indiana Lyme Connect 2016 Review and Plans for 2017

 

 

2nd of 3 advertisements in the Parke County Sentinel newspaper for Wednesday, May 18, 2016.  Awareness made possible through the Bonnie Stalker Memorial Fund.

Sentinel page 3

 

Tune into WCGL radio 96.1 FM and AM 1370 on Sunday, May 22 from 7:30am – 8:00am as Rob Humphrey interviews Indiana Lyme Connect board members, LeAnne Barta, Susan Coleman and Dr. Kim Lentz.

 

 

1st of 3 advertisements in the Parke County Sentinel newspaper for Wednesday, May 18, 2016.  Awareness made possible through the Bonnie Stalker Memorial Fund.

Parke County Ad alone 1st

Parke County Ad alone 1st

 

Parke County Ad 1

Parke County Ad 1

 

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